It’s bloody hot


The Changing Seasons. November 2017

If it wasn’t for the changing seasons I would not be posting in my blog at all. Thanks to Max and Joanne for keeping me in touch and apologies for not checking in on your stuff. Late November has seen us plunge into Summery weather, with a tropical feel. However, early November was still chilling us to the bone.

On the Melbourne cup weekend, Jo and I and two other couples attended the Maldon Folk Music Festival. I elected to not take photos of the artists; I wanted to be totally absorbed by the music. My favourite was a band from Boston called Mile Twelve. But there were many other fantastic local attractions there. In particular, Rich Davies and the Royal High Jinx. I also attended a mandolin workshop, which was fun. We camped nearby in our little caravan. I hope to be returning next year.

This month I have been a little obsessed with clouds. What am I saying; I always have been. I joined a closed FB group dedicated to clouds and have been having fun.

Jo sung at the Malmsbury Fayre last week. I enjoy taking choir pics

Plus some extra Fayre activities.

Of course, it can’t be November without some special flowers.

Plus a gnarly dead but still alive gum tree. They do things like that.gum tree

The Changing Seasons September 2017

Photography has been miles from my mind this month. It’s been a big month of music and early Spring entertainment. Removing last years dead grass has been high on my agenda. This Summer is going to be hot and dry one with the threat of fires up there with what hit us here in February 2014. This will not happen to us again.

Jo’s choir, the Pollyphonics put on a great show with a cabaret theme.

A little break in marine training on the Yarra River allowed me to grab this shot.

ship 1

The garden is moving into Spring


Our dam at the start of the season

Thanks for Max who runs the Changing Seasons. Check his blog out here


The Changing Seasons August 2017

I am so lucky to have been asked to sample down at the Gippsland Lakes this August as I don’t think I would have too much to contribute. I’ve added these photos for Max’s Changing Seasons. Please visit the page and check out some nice views of the world at different times of the year.

August is Acacia flowering time here in Victoria. I grabbed a couple of close ups.

These are both Cootamundra Wattles, Acacia Baileyana. Wattles grow through the bush like weeds and indeed, these wattles, 10s of them, have popped up since the 2014 fire, all from the seeds of one tree. These wattles are not indigenous to the area and must be kept under control. I love their flowers.

Last week I visited the Gippsland Lakes for a sampling trip. The lakes are estuarine and are mostly surrounded by farmland. While they are very beautiful and still wild in parts, they are under threat from the many uses that surround them, such as farming, industry and tourism. We sample the lakes to monitor the chemical and biological quality of the water. From this we can detect gross changes, or gradual trending, in water quality. This in turn enables us to pinpoint the possible source and can initiate discussions to influence changes in industry practices. It becomes a win-win, because most locals do not want their lakes to change while at the same time do not want to be over-regulated.

On the 2nd day, before heading out again, my colleague and I got up well before sunrise to do a spot of fishing and photography near where we were staying. It is indeed a beautiful place.


The Changing Seasons July 2017

Hi there! July in cold old Victoria it is. I have friends and family overseas and up north sunning themselves. I’m down here in the cold semi antarctic conditions. The sun is shining; it’s not snowing; it not -°; the fires roaring. There is really nothing to complain about. I maybe heading to Hobart next month. Now that will be a wintry experience for me. I’ve added these for Max’s changing seasons. Some not the best quality – apologies.

I have been seeing some very clear weather lately. The mountain – hill, in the distance in the first photograph is 120 km distant. One morning I thought saw a 160 km distant mountain but was not able to prove it.

I try to leave work early sometimes as I like to see the sunset and see my dogs in the daylight


The Changing Seasons May 2017

Out on the Bay May 10

In the garden 21 May.

Added for Max’s changing seasons


March in Southern Victoria

March is a glorious time in Southern Victoria. Beautiful warm days. Cooler nights. Dry, often too dry…..For some reason I have been struggling taking photographs. I have been loving making music; maybe that’s the reason. This evening sky at home I could not resist.mid march evening sky looking south

A gathering of old friends for a pot luck dinner. A great time had by all.pot luck dinner old friendsOut on the job on the Gippsland Lakes between sites.

Back Down at the Bay with a G&T in handSummer is moving on

Another freakin sunsetanother freakin sunset

All added for Max on his great monthly photo feature at Cardinal Guzman


Changing Seasons. January 2017

Added for Changing seasons




As I child, I cursed cool January days. My Summer was being stolen from me. I enjoyed spending all day at the pool turning very brown as well. I’m paying for that now with solar keratosis and regular skin checks and suspicious bits cut off me just in case.
There is no not wearing hats for me. The sun is a mean machine for which I have great respect. Today it is about 20° , cloudy with a bit of sun. There is no wind and I have opened all the windows. I can hear the freeway in the distance and plane high above. This is a little calm before the coming heatwave of 38° on Tuesday.
The paddock in the photo above is about kilometre from our place. I was over there two nights ago attempting to take moonrise pics. The distant air was so dirty I could barely see the moon. At this site the freeway is not as ubiquitous. Little wrens were twittering and I could hear cattle lowing in the distance. The hill is an extinct lava capped volcano from about 25000 years ago. Its about 500 m above sea level. All the land was cleared extensively in the early 1800s to make way for the graziers and to provide fuel for heating. The land was originally covered in scrub; easily removed. If not replanted and protected from ruminants, this scrub hasn’t got a chance to regrow. I have added this photo for WPC ambience


Searoad Mersey

On Thursday I was lucky enough to be asked to help on the our new work boat. I hadn’t been out for over three years and was very rusty with the tasks. While it was a very long day, it was great to get out of the lab and to be at the pointy end of my job rather than the argy bargy  negotiating I have recently been involved in.

When heading out to sea I noticed a little green ship I have been watching for years from Rosebud, knowing little of is purpose. This ship is the Searoad Mersey. searoad-mersey-smallHere’s a pic I have nicked from google of her battling Bass Strait.2088712This vessel traverses the treacherous Bass Strait daily between Melbourne and Devonport in Tasmania, and travels to King Island weekly. It is mainly a cargo vessel.

Some facts about Bass Strait.
5oo kilometres long
Maximum 350 kilometres wide
Averages 60 metres deep.525px-bass_strait_islands
Prior to the ice age melt, Bass Strait did not exist. The indigenous population travelled freely over this broad land bridge.
The majority of early settlers arrived in Port Phillip by sea. Bass Strait being only 60 metres deep and at the end of a ferocious Southern Ocean, created quite a lot of heartbreak for many emigrants. North of King Island is Cape Otway. The coastline between Cape Otway and the entrance to Port Phillip Bay is referred to the Shipwreck coast. It is not only famous for the Great Ocean Road and Bells Beach. The illustration below amply depicts what many of these wretched souls had to contend with after travelling all the way from Europe.the-storm